[USC] Miss Chiquita Banana: Here to Stay, for Better or Worse
COUNTRIES & CULTURES / FOOD / Immigration Issues / Latin American food / LATIN AMERICAN/LATINO / USC Annenberg School Projects

[USC] Miss Chiquita Banana: Here to Stay, for Better or Worse

Imagine a packed movie theater in 1950. An audience awaits Hollywood’s latest picture — but first, the commercials. An animated steamboat appears on the screen, chugging along to cheerful music. Then a beautiful woman alights. Or rather, a banana. She is “Miss Chiquita” representing prominent fruit company Chiquita Banana. By 1950, the filmgoers know her … Continue reading

[USC] Press Freedom for Israel?
COUNTRIES & CULTURES / Israel / Jewish / JOURNALISM / USC Annenberg School Projects

[USC] Press Freedom for Israel?

When I wrote this essay for a USC journalism class in October, there was no obvious sign that tensions between Israel and Palestine would soon flare up in the Gaza Strip once again. But then in mid-November Palestinians began lobbing rockets over the border. A decades-old conflict over territory and homeland picked up where it had last left off. Israel responded with air raids, and casualties resulted on both sides. U.S. media pounced on the story, filling front pages, radio reports, and TV shows. No doubt coverage in Israel and the Middle East was just as robust. But was it free of government influence and other constraints? Israel treats press freedom differently from the U.S., as my paper aims to explain. Times of war are especially sensitive. Israel and Palestine may have agreed on a cease-fire, but Israel’s political situation is still unstable. Israeli citizens — and the world — will need an active press to keep us informed about what is happening, and what we might expect next. Continue reading

[USC] Freedom of the…What?
JOURNALISM / USC Annenberg School Projects

[USC] Freedom of the…What?

The First Amendment’s Press Clause may seem simple and straightforward at first glance: “Congress shall make no law… abridging the freedom… of the press.” It guarantees that any material, even government critiques, can be published — no interference, punishment or censorship allowed. Thomas Jefferson’s oft-quoted declaration that “newspapers without a government” would be preferable to “a government without newspapers” supports this idea. The press should have not only the ability but also the constitutional right to hold government accountable. Yet various changes in the modern journalism industry threaten the press as a protected institution… Continue reading